Pain Hurt Unstable Desolation
IFOTES
ContactRegistration form

Parallel Lectures

 

Plenary and Semi-Plenary sessions

 

Workshops and Discussion Groups

 

Download Parallel PDF (77Kb)

 

 

THURSDAY, 12 JULY 2007

 

TES Parallel Lectures: 12.00-13.15 and 17.00-18.15

 

 

Telephone Emergency Services: Listening on the phone and internet

 

 

AL01

Listening as a way to help. The course of our emotions through Help Lines

 

Maria Raffaella ROSSIN, Psychotherapist

 

Institution: ASL, Milan, Italy

 

Brief Biography: Psychologist, psychotherapist in systemic training, involved in the treatment of alcohol dependency. Coordinator for the alcohol abuse services of ASL, Milan. Involved in Help Line work.

 

Abstract:

Volunteers who offer their services to Help Lines are confronted with very strong emotions and "deafening" silences. Learning how to listen to the other's voice while allowing oneself to be emotionally involved and to transmit these emotions creates a two-way form of help and change useful for both protagonists. Why does this happen and how is does a call that aims to help differfrom an empathetic relationship that produces a change?

 

Languages: Italian, German, French, English, Spanish

 

 

AL01

Strategies and experiments promoting emotional balance on the phone and internet

 

Stefan SCHUMACHER, Dr. rerum socialis

 

Institution: TelefonSeelsorge Hagen-Mark, Hagen, Germany

 

Brief Biography: Post director of TES; German delegate of IFOTES;Theologian, Social Scientist, Master trainer & Coach in Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) and a certified counsellor in Focusing; specialising in the architecture of life-balance concepts.

 

Abstract:

Raising listeners’ consciousness of the meaning of emotional support through practical examples and experiments. Presenting useful strategies to promote emotional balance using ideas from psychological concepts like Focusing, NLP, Hypnotherapy and Logotherapy. These ideas will be embedded into results of actual keywords in neurological science.

 

Web site address: www.drschumacher.de; www.telefonseelsorge-hagen-mark.de

 

Languages: German, Italian, French, English, Spanish

 

 

Telephone Emergency Services:

Challenges for a 40 year old organisation

 

 

AL02

Challenges from a society in change to a 40 year old organization

 

Jesus MADRID-SORIANO

 

Institution: Asociación Internacional del Teléfono de la Esperanza, Spain

 

Brief Biography: President of Asociación Internacional del Teléfono de la Esperanza, present in eight countries of Latin America, London, Zürich and Porto. Lecturer in several post-graduate courses and author of several technical books about Volunteers and their relation to aid. Lecturer with very different audiences and contexts and leader of many courses inhelping relationships for volunteers and professionals.

 

Abstract:

IFOTES has made countless contributions to society over 40 years, especially in Europe; but, in order to remain faithful to its original spirit it is necessary to be open to the new challenges ofmodern society. For example: by using the technological revolution as an aid instrument, removing cultural barriers, stressing the importance of personal encounters in a dehumanized society, reframing some principles of IFOTES that are perhaps out of phase with today, removing some of the institutional limits that make it difficult to expand the presence of IFOTES.

 

Web site address: www.telefonodelaesperanza.org

 

Languages: Spanish, English, German, French, Italian

 

 

AL02

IFOTES e TAI: 1967-2007

 

IFOTES International Committee representative

TAI representative

 

Institutions: IFOTES and Telefono Amico Italia

 


 

FRIDAY, 13 JULY 2007

 

Parallel Lectures: 11.00-12.00

 

Existential boredom and the meaning of life

 

 

BL01 Boredom and Anxiety. A philosophical approach

 

Roberto GARAVENTA, Professor of History of Philosophy

Institution: University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy

 

Brief Biography: at the University of Pescara-Chieti he holds the chairs of 19th and 20th century philosophy, philosophical anthropology, and political philosophy.
Specialisation: German philosophers of the 19th and 20th centuries, works on suicide, boredom, death, anxiety, religion.

 

Abstract:
If intense and existential boredom (not to be confused with occasional or circumstantial boredom) is a condition of our mind caused by a loathing of the monotony of everyday life or the perception that our existence lacks meaning, we are overcome by a sense of anxiety. This may be because we have to make a decision about our future, or that we are obliged to recognise our personal limits, weaknesses, loneliness or the decline of our life leading to death.

 

Web site address: www.unich.it/filosofia/filosofia/docenti

 

Languages: German, French, English

 

 

Emotions and health

 

BL02

Emotions, the five elements and the three energies

 

Gioacchino PAGLIARO, Psychologist and Psychotherapist

Director General of Clinical Psychology, BellariaHospital, Bologna

Lecturer in Clinical Psychology, Psychology Department of PaduaUniv.

 

Institution:AUSL Bologna and Padua University, Italy

 

Brief Biography: Currently operates in Clinical and Holistic Psychology in the Oncology Division, AUSL Bologna. Manages wellbeing training courses for the hospital staff using meditative methods.

In the University field involved in research and training the application of the holistic model in Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy. Often travels to China and attends Tibetan centres.

 

Abstract:

The report points out the link between the five elements, the three energies and emotions involved in conserving our health or the onset of an illness. With regards to the theoretical outlook of Tibetan Buddhist Psychology, the main aspects and practices aimed at energy development and health conservation will be presented.

 

Languages: Italian, French, German

 

 

BL02

Emotional resonances in palliative care. Listening toemotional suffering in the last stage of life from the perspective of Music Therapy

 

Elisabeth COUETTE, music therapist

 

Brief Biography: Elisabeth Couette devoted herself to concerts and theatre music after studying the flute at Marseilles conservatory. In addition, she took lessons from jazz pianist Michel Petrucciani. In Paris she took the Music Therapy course at the university, specialising in accompanying the dying. For years she has been an active flute player and music therapist in both France and the Netherlands. She gives lectures and workshops on the influence that music has on people, particularly in the last stage of life.

 

Abstract

Musical language has analogical qualities with spoken language and emotional processes. Music Therapy can give new directions to the search for emotional health and quality of life, until death: how to improve listening to words, non-verbal signals, and silences from people facing cancer and other life-threatening diseases; how can music therapy help tobecomeaware of colours, intonations and corporal resonances within our own spoken voice.

 

Languages: Italian, French, German

 

 

 

Suicide prevention

 

BL03

Project for suicide prevention “Amalia-Telefono Speciale”

 

Corrado CRUSIZ, Manager in the health department ASL Trieste

Institution:Azienda per i Servizi Sanitari N°1 Triestina, Italy

 

Brief Biography: Expert in psychology of the cycle of life. Psychologist at the operative unit for children and adolescents in the Distretto 2 of Trieste

Abstract:

Suicide representsone of the major problem of public health and has to be faced with global strategies supported by a variety of approaches and interventions. The prevention programme operating in the province of Trieste since 1997 will be described.

 

Web site address: www.triestesalutementale.it

 

Languages: Italian, English, Spanish

 

 

BL03

Lifeline and LivingWorks collaborate internationally on suicide first-aid 

 

 

Mary PARSISSONS

Institution:Life Line International, Australia

 

Abstract:

The global challenge of preventing suicide requires consistent, competent care across all cultures and countries. Lifeline has been collaborating with LivingWorks Eduction to provide training in suicide first aid for telephone crisis workers. This presentation will outline what this training involves and illustrate activities, evaluations and challenges in developing competent helpers in a variety of cultural settings in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Samoa, Africa and Japan.

 

Web site address:www.lifeline.org.au

 

Languages: Italian, English, Spanish

 

 

BL03

TES e Psychiatry: experiences in Palermo with AFIPRES

 

Giuseppe MAZZOLA, psychiatrist and scientific consultant for AFIPRES

Institution: AFIPRES, Palermo, Italy

 

Abstract:

After examining all the risks to which potential suicide candidates are exposed, prevention according to the criteriaof the clinicalevidence will be evaluated

 

Web site address: www.afipres.org

Languages: Italian, English, Spanish

 

 

Parallel Lectures: 12.15-13.15

 

 

Research programmes on TES work and volunteers

 

BL04

What telephone help methods have positive effects on callers in suicidal crisis? Results from silent monitoring of calls by volunteers and paid staff

 

Brian MISHARA, Professor


Institution: Centre for Research and Intervention on Suicide and Euthanasia
Université du Québec à Montréal

 

Brief Biography: Director of the Centre for Research and Intervention on Suicide and Euthanasia and Psychology Professor at the University of Quebec at Montreal. President of the International Association for Suicide Prevention

 

Abstract:
We present the results of a study in the USA in which we listened to 2,011 telephone calls to crisis centres in the national toll-free suicide prevention network and conducted observations of helper behaviours and caller reactions. We also describe studies in Quebec comparing help by volunteers and paid staff and their effects. We present models of effective telephone interventions and comparisons of styles and effects of help by volunteers and paid staff.

 

Web site address: www.crise.ca; www.iasp.info

 

Languages: English, German, Italian


 

 

BL05

The influence of personality, emotional competence and empathy on emotion-regulation: dealing with emotions in different types of social interaction – Second part: focus on the main questions and perspectives for the continuation of the research

 

Tanja WRANIK

Katia SCHENKEL

 

Institutions: Department of Psychology & SwissCenter for Affective Sciences - University of Geneva, CH

 

Abstract: see AS01

 

Web site address: www.affective-sciences.ch

 

Languages: English, French, Spanish

 

 

BL06

The letter in a bottle in the InternetOcean: implicit requests for help in e-mails sent to Telefono Amico Italia – Second part: focus on the main questions and perspectives for the continuation of the research

 

Paola FORNASIER

Luca RUSI

Institution:Department of General Psychology - University of Padova, Italy

 

Abstract: see AS01

 

Languages: German, Italian, Spanish

 

 

 

SATURDAY, 14 JULY 2007

 

 

Parallel Lectures: 11.00-12.00

 

 

Education Programme for Children

 

CL01

The relevance of compassionate communication in education

 

Nada IGNJATOVIC-SAVIC, Psychologist

Institution:Non-Violent Communication Centre, Serbia

 

Abstract:

Starting from the point of view that education is about developing heart and soul as well as body and mind, the presentation will first give an overview of the observed shortages of habitual school practices to meet that purpose.

These observations were point of depart for several projects that the author and her team conducted with the support of UNICEF in the schools in Serbia since 1991, with the basic intent to implement programmes facilitating the development of emotional and personal awareness and integrity; social cognition and communication skills providing harmonious social relationships as well as of genuine motivation for learning and knowledge acquisition. Since 2000, these intervention programs are acknowledged by the Ministry of Education of Serbia as an integral part of teachers’ training and educative practice with children.

The presentation will summarize the basic features and effects of the intervention programmes - based on author’s interactive approach and M. Rosenberg's model of non-violent, compassionate communication. 

Web site address: www.nvc-europe.org

Languages:English, French, German

 

CL01

Helping Young Children to Develop Coping Skills

 

Chris BALE, Director Partnership for Children

Institution:Partnership for Children, United Kingdom

 

Abstract:

Zippy’s Friends is a programme that helps young children (five to seven year olds) to develop coping and social skills.  It is being taught in primary schools and kindergartens around the world, by teachers who are specially trained.  Children learn how to cope with issues such as conflict resolution, difficulties with communication and friendship, bullying, change and loss, and bereavement.  The programme is managed by a non-profit agency called Partnership for Children.  This lecture will introduce the course content, show the programme being taught in different countries, and reveal the latest evaluation results.  It will also explain how Zippy’s Friends can be introduced to more children in more countries.

 

Web site address: www.partnershipforchildren.org.uk

 

Languages:English, French, German

 

 

 

Internet Counselling

 

CL02

The letter in a bottle in the InternetOcean: implicit requests for help in e-mails sent to Telefono Amico Italia – Second part: focus on the main questions and perspectives for the continuation of the research

 

Paola FORNASIER

Luca RUSI

Institution:Department of General Psychology - University of Padova, Italy

 

Abstract: see AS01

 

Languages: English, French, Italian

 

 

CL02

University students’ Internet mediated narratives about depression and stress

 

Camilla Granholm

 

TES organisation: Församlingarnas Samtalstjänst i Södra Finland, Helsinki, Finland

 

Abstract

A short lecture where I explain the conclusions of my Master’s theses written for the department of social work at the University of Helsinki.

 

Languages: English, French, Italian

 

 

CL02

Sharing emotions by Internet exchanges

 

Jean-Pierre IGOT

 

TES organisation: S.O.S Amitié Internet, France

 

Abstract

Many TES are testing or running new help services using Internet tools such e-mails, instant messages or variousforms of chat services. A very important question oftenemergesfrom the volunteers : how can I hear the emotions behind written messages?

 

Languages: English, French, Italian

 

 

CL02

Internet Counselling

 

Johanne Aas Inger

 

TES organisation: Kirkens SOS in Oslo, Norway

 

Abstract

Training in intervention on crisis e-mails. Our method’s tools for seeing,supporting and empowering. Supervising crisis e-mails: emotionally difficult/demanding e-mails may create strong emotional reactions.

 

Languages: English, French, Italian

 

 

 

TES and Crisis Helplines Development

 

CL03

Challenges from Latin America and Eastern Europe to IFOTES

 

Carlos-Julio MOYA

 

TES organisation : Telefono de la Esperanza de Madrid, Spain

 

Abstract

Latin America and Eastern Europe face IFOTES in front of the realty of countries with many institutions and volunteers with a deep motivation for providing emotional support and with a society with very urgent needs but with a serious lack of material and economical resources.

The lecturer will present the situation of some of these countries and the work of TES which are providing services there.

 

Languages: English, German, Spanish

 

CL03

The development of LifeLine programmes in West Africa

 

Virginia BAINBRIDGE, Executive Director, CONTACT USA

Institutions:CONTACT USA, Trenton, New Jersey, USA

 

Brief Biography: serves on the LifeLine International Board and the Certification and Training Committee of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. CONTACT USA, a member of LifeLine International, is a national association of telephone helpline programs (41 member agencies).

 

Abstract:

LifeLine International and CONTACT USA are working to develop new LifeLine programs in Ghana, Togo, Liberia and Benin. This presentation will discuss the difficulties and rewards of developing culturally relevantand accessible programs in areas where the people are poor and underserved and where their languages are diverse.

 

Web site address: www.contact-usa.org

 

Languages: English, German, Spanish

 

 

CL03

Personal Disclosure in a Traditionally Oral Culture – The Samoan Experience

 

O'feira SALEVAO, Director, Faataua-Le-Ola & Samoa LifeLine

Ian PARKIN, Vice-Chair, Faataua-Le-Ola & Samoa LifeLine

Acting Head of Mental Health Unit, TTMHospitalApia, Samoa

Institutions:Faataua-Le-Ola & Samoa LifeLine, Apia, Samoa

 

Brief Biography: O’feira Salevao has been the director of the Samoa LifeLine since it commenced operating in 2000.  Dr Ian Parkin, the country’s only psychiatrist, joined the board in 2005 as vice-chair.

 

Abstract:

Samoa has a strong tradition of oratory and tale telling. The spoken word is the preferred method of communication. There are however several culturally related barriers to personal disclosure and to the conceptualisation of personal distress in a culture that sees the self as merged with the extended family.  This lecture will discuss these cultural issues as well as the trends in usage of the Samoa LifeLine and its probable contribution to a reduction in suicides.

 

Languages: English, German, Spanish

 

 

Parallel Lectures: 12.15-13.15

 

Education Programme for Adolescents

 

CL04

Samaritans and Emotional Health Promotion in Schools

 

Tonja SCHMIDT,Development Co-ordinator

 

Institution:Samaritans UK and Republic of Ireland

 

Brief Biography: Taking forward the development of new areas of work and services for Samaritans, specialising in promoting emotional health among young people.

 

Abstract:

Samaritans UK/ROI has been conducting outreach with schools for many years.84% of branches are active in schools, reaching an estimated 77,000 young people in 2005.

Research commissioned by Samaritans and carried out by the University of Oxford Centre for Suicide Research in 2001, ‘Youth and self harm: Perspectives’, found that one in ten young people aged 15-16 self-injure to relieve intense emotional pain, as a way of ‘screaming without words.’It recognised a need to help young people to find effective coping and help-seeking strategies, and to care for their own wellbeing.

This prompted the development of an emotional health promotion strategy ‘Changing our World.’ Published in 2004, it set out Samaritans’ intentions to benefit society by improving people’s emotional health, hence providing a greater sense of wellbeing. It identified work with schools as a priority setting.

The ‘Developing Emotional Awareness and Learning’ (DEAL) programme was developed to meet the need for emotional health promotion amongst young people.Targeted at 14-16 year olds, it aims to:

Promote emotional health awareness and challenge stigma

Develop healthy coping skills

Increasing awareness of sources of support and promote a positive attitude to help seeking.

DEAL can be used as part of a whole-school approach to emotional health.One in five young people in the UK suffers from psychological problems.DEAL is available to all schools to help improve emotional health in our society.

 

Web site address: www.samaritans.org and www.samaritans.org/deal

 

Languages: English, French, German

 

 

CL04

Why schools should be teaching well-being

 

Anthony Seldon

 

Institution:WellingtonCollege, Crowthorne, Berkshire - United Kingdom

 

Brief Biography: Master (Headmaster) of WellingtonCollege, one of Britain’s most Famous Schools.Leading authority on education and politics.Author and editor of 25 books, including biographies of John Major and Tony Blair.

 

Abstract:

The talk will explain why conventional school curriculum for 5-18 year olds in the developed world need to be reconstructed around the ‘multiple aptitudes’ model, in which teaching ‘well-being’ is paramount.

 

Web site address: www.wellingtoncollege.org.uk

 

Languages: English, French, German

 

 

 

Building Emotional Health at Work and in Daily Life

 

CL05

WorkLife training programme

 

Jonathan MORAN, External Training Services Coordinator

Institution:Samaritans UK and Republic of Ireland

 

Brief Biography: Coordinating Samaritans External Training Programme, with 10 years experience in learning and development, including coordinating the development of Samaritans national volunteer training packages.

 

Abstract:

In the UK 12.8 million working days were lost due to stress, depression and anxiety in 2004, at a cost of £3.8 billion.Samaritans has developed a range of external training courses which are offered to businesses to help them to improve communications and in turn enable them to do their work more effectively. 

The external courses provide practical skills for managers or team members to deal with challenging people-based situations, and also to equip them to handle difficult contacts from clients.Based on core Samaritans principles, the courses help people better manage their own experience at work, providing a practical approach to building emotionally healthy & productive teams.

The service has attracted major clients, including voluntary organisations, government departments and leading commercial companies.

 

Web site address: www.samaritans.org

 

Languages: English, French, Spanish

 

 

CL05

Is there any good use of anguish in a social telephone relationship?

 

Michel MONTHEIL, psychologist

 

Institutions:S.O.S Amitié La Rochelle (France)

 

Brief Biography: psychologist, couple therapist, supervisor, specialised in sexology, mourning. Works for S.O.S Amitié since 1987.

 

Abstract

Starting with some clinical situations, we shall look at normal or abnormal anguish/anxiety, and see what help we can give a listener when he accepts that a part of anguish is useful: it structures the being and is on the side of life.

 

Languages: English, French, Spanish

 

 

 

Research programmes on TES work and volunteers

 

CL06

The influence of personality, emotional competence and empathy on emotion-regulation: dealing with emotions in different types of social interaction – Second part: focus on the main questions and perspectives for the continuation of the research

 

Tanja WRANIK

Katia SCHENKEL

Institutions: Department of Psychology & SwissCenter for Affective Sciences - University of Geneva, CH

 

Abstract: see AS01

 

Web site address: www.affective-sciences.ch

 

Languages: English, German, Italian